Staters

The most prolific form of human-used currency are lumps of stamped electrum. Minotaur also uses this system of currency, of which they borrowed from their human neighbors. These electrum coins usually had different names based on their points of origin and the impression of the stamp, but all are collectively known as staters (lit. “weight”, meaning “standard”). In most human societies, one stater is worth a twelveday of a soldier’s service and is enough to pay for their family’s basic needs during that time.

There are several denominations of staters. They include sixtieth (1/60) staters, twelfth (1/12) staters, quarter (1/4) staters, full staters, quadruple (x4) staters, duodecuple (x12) staters, and sexagintuple (x60) staters. A twelfth stater weighs one-twelfth of full stater, a quarter stater weight one-half of a full stater and so on and so forth. The stater is also a measurement of weight in Olympia with 12 staters being roughly equivalent to our imperial pounds. When used as a currency, the stater is usually referred to by either its denomination or the local name for its denomination. When used as a unit of weight, it is referred to as a stater (abbr. “st.”).

When converting values from the standard 5th edition rules into staters, the ratio is 1 stater to 12 gold pieces or 1 gold piece to 1 twelfth stater

Staters

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